Leaving the Flock and Becoming Feral

A feral animal is defined as one living in the wild but descended from domesticated individuals. Wikipedia says, “as with an introduced species, the introduction of feral animals or plants to non-native regions may disrupt ecosystems and has, in some cases, contributed to extinction of indigenous species.” Perhaps no other single sentence showcases the idea behind wild/STRONG than this.

 Being Feral is about leaving the flock behind - trading in safety and comfort for freedom.

Being Feral is about leaving the flock behind - trading in safety and comfort for freedom.

We are, for the most part, raised in domesticated settings, taught that there are certain rules to live by, a path set out for us that we should follow. This path is defined by society, by those that seek to create consumers, not individuals. This path is a one-way trip to boredom – a life that will be looked back on from a hospital bed with nothing but regret and mourning – a stark realization that you did nothing, you were nothing and you died as nothing. I am here to tell you there is another path – a path that disrupts, and if done right, can “contribute to [the] extinction of indigenous species.”

The indigenous species we seek to render extinct are the weak, domesticated sheep – feeding 24 hours a day from teet of the shepherds guiding their mindless wanderings. As long as you continue to feed – to consume – you’ll be kept safe. The wild/STRONG are the wolves – the feral predators, once domesticated -  that now have chosen a different life - to hunt for their food on the outskirts of this flock, in the dark corners of the valleys – refusing the hand-outs and illusions of safety and comfort offered to the sheep. This way of life has more risk – with that risk comes a reward that cannot be attained in the flock – freedom. Freedom to live life the way you want – no fear of social rebuke, no “choosing” between two similar options forced on you by someone else.

 You are different. Your mere presence should be disruptive to any social setting.

You are different. Your mere presence should be disruptive to any social setting.

We are raised to be domesticated consumers – sheep raised from infancy to become a member of the flock. The indoctrination and domestication begins as early as you are old enough to remember – play by the rules, share your toys, go to school, get your degree, get a job, pay your taxes, get married, have kids, two weeks of vacation a year, own the right things, say the right things, retire and die. Be part of the flock. Anything that would dissuade you from fulfilling this predetermined role, is shunned by society, mocked by your peers and made difficult by those in charge. Do not allow your thirst for something different to be quenched by a group who wants you “in your place.”

You are different. Your mere presence in any social setting should be disruptive. Your ideas and view of the world and how things are should challenge the status quo. I have been called a contrarian - and while this is a simplistic label – it is not one I dispute. It is a label that allows those who don’t share my views to “understand” me. I don’t simply disagree with a group for the sake of disagreeing – I just rarely share the views of any group. If the majority thinks one thing, that’s usually enough for me to take pause and explore the position – upon that exploration I generally come to a conclusion vastly different than the flock. The problem with most of society is they skip the exploration process. When something is “generally accepted” – that’s enough for them. Sharing a view that contradicts these generally accepted ideas, it is often met with shock, rolled eyes or, as is becoming more and more common in today’s society, outrage. These reactions give me confidence that I have come to the proper conclusion. The approval of the masses is the greatest indicator of a faulty ideology.

 Surround yourselves with people who challenge you, who challenge the status quo. You'll become a better version of yourself.

Surround yourselves with people who challenge you, who challenge the status quo. You'll become a better version of yourself.

People don’t want their ideas challenged. They don’t want to be forced to think. Look at the entertainment we seek out – reality television, mindless political chatter, indoctrinated sitcoms about emasculated men seeking the approval of women. The easier it is to digest, the less we have to think, the more popular it is. The sheep watching these programs don’t even realize they are being lobotomized into accepting a radical feminist, multicultural, leftist, self-loathing, consume-at-all-cost view of the world. When you challenge these forms of thinking, you become the outcast – and to that I say, cast me out, because I don’t want to be a part of this shit. I don’t want to be a member of this flock.

I laugh heartily every time I see someone post a meme with the overused quote “Lions don’t lose sleep over the opinions of sheep.” I laugh because 9 times out of 10, I have seen the person posting it lose their minds on social media because their ideas were met with anything but a “like” or agreement and praise by their peers. This isn’t a fucking meme, this is a way of life. If having your ideas challenged makes you angry – your ideas probably suck and were likely conceived from a “general acceptance” – a head-down-feeding-from-the-hand-of-the-shepherd attitude that I want no part of. If this article makes you angry, think about the reasons why. You see, the difference between us is simple – I don’t fucking care what you think about me. Your outrage over my opinions means nothing to me.

Think for yourself. Stop caring how others view your opinions. Stop saying you don’t care what other people think and start actually living that way.  Remove yourself from the flock – become an outcast. The feral dog – once domesticated, now living wild and free and hunting for his own food. He doesn’t lose sleep over the opinions of sheep - because he is too busy killing and eating them – not because he is posting memes on Facebook.